China ends the 25-year ban on rhino horn and tiger bone usage

Rated 5/5 (2 people). Log in to rate.

On Monday, China legalised the use of rhinoceros horns and tiger bones for medical, scientific and educational purposes. According to local beliefs, "drugs" based on rhino horns or tiger bones act on potency, fever, insomnia and more. Although there is no scientific evidence to support these beliefs.

Despite the fact that 25 years ago China introduced a total ban on the import and export of rhino horns and tiger bones, it still did not stop poachers from brutal attacks on endangered species to provide "trophies" to the black market.  

This may be the end for the rare species - their defenders who fought for years to save the shrinking populations of tigers and rhinos have been worried for years about the continuous decrease in population. So far, as a result of their actions, almost the entire population of these wonderful animals has already been killed. It is thought there are only 30,000 rhinos and 4,000 tigers left in the world. 

The reason why the Chinese authorities made this decision is not fully known. Perhaps one of the factors that led to this is the growing number of tiger farms and efforts to create such for rhinos. The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) stated in its report from 2013 that in China at least several thousand tigers were kept in more than one hundred farms across the country. According to the organisation's information, the import of rhinos that were to be sent back to the farms also started.  

A kilogram of rhino horn powder on the black market now costs $80,000. This is twice as much as gold or cocaine 

On the day following the publication of the legalisation, the Chinese spokesperson for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, Lu Kang, maintained Beijing's position, claiming that the reversal of the ban was in line with "reasonable needs of reality". 

“It’s a devastating decision,” the WWF’s director of wildlife policy, Leigh Henry, told The New York Times. “WWF urgently calls on China to maintain the ban on tiger bone and rhino horn trade which has been so critical in conserving these iconic species. This should be expanded to cover trade in all tiger parts and products.”

Comments

No comments have been made. Please log in to comment.
 

Top stories from Radar

Getting it done- time management for students

University can, at times, be very stressful and time-consuming. As students, we often have multiple commitments, and 24 hours are just not enough. Solution? Improving your time management.

 
Go-Ahead of Trump's new Golf Course in Aberdeenshire

A decision by Councillors to allow another Trump golf course in Aberdeenshire has caused local outrage, with protestors arguing that it could endanger the natural habitat and prevent access to the beach.

 
Halloween decoration on a budget

This article looks at five ideal ways to decorate for Halloween on a student budget.
With the covid-19 lockdown restrictions, we have a lot more time on our hands. This makes for the perfect excuse to dabble in the arts and crafts and hand-make affordable, yet still spook-tecular, Halloween decorations.

 
RGU:Union Black History Month - a round up

This month the Union has been putting on a range of events to celebrate Black History Month. Although the events have had to be online, to comply with the covid-19 restrictions, there has still been a wide range of activities to appeal to everyone. These include NetflixParties, ‘Safe Space Discussions’ and fundraising quizzes.