Nobel Prize for protein research

No ratings yet. Log in to rate.

Three people jointly received the Nobel Chemistry prize this year.  

Professor Frances H. Arnold was awarded half the prize for her work with directed evolution. method whereby mutated enzymes are introduced to bacteria that then use them as templates to create new mutated enzymes. The enzymes that are most efficient are then selected, new random mutations are introduced and the cycle begins again.  

These enzymes have been used in, among other things, the production of renewable energy and pharmaceuticals.  

Prof. Arnold was the first to make use of this method in 1993 and it has now become routinely used.  

The other half of the Nobel prize is shared between George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter.  

In 1985 George introduced a new method, using a virus that infects bacteria to evolve new proteins and called it Phage display. Gregory then used this method for directed evolution to create new antibodies. Antibodies are protective proteins usually created by the immune system. These antibodies have been used in various ways, for example, to cure metastatic cancer.  

The possibilities for the two methods are endless, only time will tell what else could potentially come of this. 

Comments

No comments have been made. Please log in to comment.
 

Top stories from Radar

New Zealand Prime Minister Bans Military Style Weapons

The Prime Minister of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, has confirmed that new laws will be put in place to ban semi-automatic and assault rifles following the Christchurch mosque attacks.

 
Aberdeen Horror-Themed Pub to be Transformed into metropolitan Club After a Complete Rebranding.

Horror lovers will soon lose one of the most famous Aberdeen pubs on Belmont Street. It is rebranding but Aberdonians are not giving up.

 
Graduate Apprenticeships at RGU See Major Expansion

Developed by Skills Development Scotland, the programme started off with two courses - one for IT Management and Software Development. However, these courses have gone into a number of new sectors.

 
Scottish Schools are First to Have LGBT+ Classes

All pupils in Scottish state schools will be the first in the world to have LGBT+ history, movements, and issues embedded into their curriculum. This is an historic moment in history as only eighteen years ago local authorities in the UK were banned from ‘promoting’ homosexuality.