The Post Review

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"The press are to serve the governed, not the governors." 

The Post, directed and acted by three powerhouse names within Hollywood, provides a keen reminder to its viewers, the power the press can wield when pushed to do so. Its story unfolds a true sense of the sheer influence journalists can have on any person and what they will do in order to fight for their right to print regardless if it is controversial or not. This film makes you revel in how quickly the press can create tsunami-worthy waves of altering opinions and perception on world affairs, especially, when the crisis is sitting right at the reader's doorstep.  

It is written and edited with a flow of such ease, you don’t even question the time it has taken to view the film. You find yourself completely immersed as the story slowly unfolds. For some, the time taken to tell the plot could be considered a bit boring but you could never say the film is dry and dull. It is a film that resonates but it is hard to say whether it would stay with you after you finish watching. There wasn’t that sole defining moment where you could determine where it becomes truly gritty and emotionally provocative. It does not fill you with a feeling of tension and there isn't a great finale – so to speak - where you feel the characters strife has been rewarded.  

This could be down to the writing as it was made for Oscar nominations and thus there cannot be any ebbing in the story. It has to be solid and consistent. Just like it's actors. Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks – as always - acted beautifully and really held their roles with such finesse. The seasoned actors executed their lines with great ease and made the characters their own. The supporting cast was considerably fine but there was no distinguishable performance within them. They performed well enough to let the leads truly shine.  

This could be considered mere musings and too deep of thinking for the reasoning behind the film being made. Nevertheless, there are mutterings that this film offers some reflection on the current political climate where leaders and politicians are being questioned on alleged deceits towards the general public and their parties. Modern journalists are also facing similar disdain as being branded as liars and perpetrators of "fake news". The film shows the viewer a parallel circumstance from past events which –you could say - are happening at this very moment.  It makes you question was this film produced to shed light on how journalists are the truth bearers within our society and is there no person of power who can reverse this role?   

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